How to brush your dogs teeth

A step-by-step guide to brushing your dogs t

How to brush your dogs teeth

Introducing your dog to tooth brushing

Introducing a good dental care regime into a dog or cat's life from an early age is a great way to bond as well as giving an owner the change to get to know what is normal in your pet's mouth. This will then become the norm for your pet, making brushing easier (some dogs love the flavour of toothpaste so see it as a treat). If your pet hasn't been exposed to tooth brushing from an early age, it's not too late to try. Patience is key and offering a healthy treat as positive reinforcement is often a good way to introduce them. t as a treat). If your pet hasn't been exposed to tooth brushing from an early age, it's not too late to try. Patience is key and offering a healthy treat as positive reinforcement is often a good way to introduce them. 

 

Step-by-step guide to brushing your dogs teeth

  1. Begin by lifting your pet's lips to expose the teeth. Build on this by giving them lots of fuss and praise
  2. Once the pet is used to having their mouth touched on the outside, start running your finder along their teeth
  3. Once your cat or dog is accustomed to having the inside of their mouth touched, introduce them to a toothbrush and toothpaste in a similar way. Start by squeezing a small amount of toothpaste onto your finder and letting them lick it off (Beaphar Toothpaste is liver flavoured so most dogs and cats love it).
  4. Once they are used to the taste, introduce the toothbrush by letting them lick the toothpaste off it.
  5. When your dog or cat is comfortable with this, it is time to combine all the elements of training; brush a few teeth at first and gradually build it up until all the teeth can be brushed.


How often should I brush my dogs teeth?

Every day is the gold standard - this will help prevent the build up of plaque and formation of tartar. However, any brushing is better than none, so brushing thoroughly 2-3 times a week should be enough to see a difference in overall heath.

What if my dog doesn't like their teeth being brushed?

Some dogs simply won't let you brush their teeth, especially if you are introducing them to the toothbrush when they are older. However, there are alternative products that you can use that will help your dogs dental hygiene, including Dental Powder which you sprinkle over your dogs food, Tooth Gel which uses enzymes to break down tarter and plaque, and even a Fresh Breath Easy Treat.


Our helpful dental video

 
 



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